Feb 23, 2020
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Add/drop deadline upcoming

If you’re planning on adding or dropping a class without the hassle of collecting permission numbers and instructors’ signatures, the deadline is Jan. 29.

This date is especially important for those students wobbling between part-time and full-time status.

“Jan. 29 is the last day that a student paying full-time fees can get a partial refund if they drop below six units, which is the part-time load,” said Tina Beddall, from the University Registrars Office. “Students who drop after the deadline, even with permission, will not get a refund.”

If you try to add a class after this date you will need a permission number from the instructor of the course, and will have until Tuesday, Feb. 12 to add online using that number.

Likewise, in order to drop a class after the Jan. 29 deadline, you will need the approval of your professor by way of his or her signature. This can be done using a drop card obtained from the Admissions, Records, and Evaluations Office. The deadline for drops with approval is also Feb. 12.

“Deadlines are based on the first 20 days of instruction, the first 10 of which students are allowed to add and drop freely; the next 10 they need permission,” Beddall said. “The reason for this timeline is that on day 20, the Chancellor’s office tells us that we need to make official calculations about how many students are on campus, etc.”

After the Feb. 12 deadline, students will no longer be allowed to add classes, and will only be allowed to drop for serious and compelling reasons, which include “serious medical conditions that prevent a student from attending classes, or the death of an immediate family member,” Beddall said.

All drops that deal with serious and compelling reasons must be taken up with the college dean.

“There are eight deans for each of the eight colleges and a student dropping for serious reasons needs to ask the department office for the class they are dropping, which college the course is under and then contact the dean of that college to drop that class,” Beddall said.

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