Aug 07, 2020
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UHS students a campus nuisance

CAN ANYONE PLEASE explain to me what kind of school this is? Are we still in high school or are we in college?

Am I the only one who is sick and tired of the growing high school population on campus?

And for that matter, has anyone but me had to wait in a line behind 50 high school students just to grab a bite to eat?

I can understand that these students are special in some way to grant them access to a college campus, but if they are to be on a campus designed for higher education, can we not block them from the whole of the student body and just give them a corner to play on?

There are numerous reasons I ask for the isolation of the high school from the rest of the campus.

First of all, the overcrowding of the Free Speech Area and the restaurants in and around it during lunch is ridiculous.

If schools are trying to get their high school students to eat healthier, they should not be allowed into Round Table, Taco Bell, Subway or Panda Express. Additionally, The Bucket sells alcohol, so why would people who are underage be allowed in the sports bar?

And don’t you worry — I am not forgetting the fact that all fraternity and sorority booths are located in the Free Speech Area.

Why would they allow high school students to fraternize with the fraternal organizations with all the underage problems that they are currently having?

Secondly, what is with these young kids thinking that they can run faster than my car? Don’t they have parents that tell them if they cross the road and I am driving, I may “accidentally” run them over?

Are they going to make us put in a crossing guard because these kids don’t have half a brain to cross at an appropriate time and at the right location?

The problem with what Fresno State has done is that they have taken what is held by some to be a social privilege and turned it into a playground for kids that love to annoy people.

Please make it stop.

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