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Dec 12, 2018
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Fresno State to host discussion on arsenic-contaminated groundwater

The California Water Institute at Fresno State will host a discussion with local water-safety experts to discuss a research study released in June that suggests the overpumping of groundwater in the San Joaquin Valley can contaminate the drinking water supply with the dangerous chemical arsenic, according to a university news release.

The event, known as the Arsenic Symposium, will take place at the Satellite Student Union on Thursday, Oct. 11, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and is free to the public. The forum comes just one day after the fourth annual Imagine a Day Without Water, a national day of education and advocacy regarding the value of water.

Thomas C. Esqueda, the associate vice president in water sustainability at Fresno State, said the “event is a prime example of the types of water-related programs that Fresno State will present to promote dialogue, collaboration and cooperation on critically important water issues.”

The discussion will feature several presentations from water-safety researchers, including Dr. Scott Fendorf of Stanford, who will share the findings of a study on overpumping dangers.

Chris Johnson, a Fresno State alumnus and groundwater consultant, will present the findings of a study of arsenic levels in Hanford water from the 1990s.

Other speakers include Dr. Beth Weinman, associate professor in Fresno State’s department of earth and environmental sciences, as well as experts in groundwater modelling, groundwater quality monitoring and drinking water regulators from the U.S. Geological Survey and State Water Resources Control Board.

In addition to presentations, the event will also host brainstorming sessions for further steps to address the groundwater arsenic problem.

The California Water Institute at Fresno State has been providing education, research and analysis of water policy issues since its inception in 2000.

“We encourage folks to attend this important water event and to join with Fresno State faculty, staff and students to identify and implement cost-effective and timely solutions to the state’s most pressing water resource management challenges,” Esqueda said.

 

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