Ezra Miller as The Flash, Ben Affleck as Batman and Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman in the film ‘Justice League.’ (Warner Bros. Pictures)

How ‘Justice League’ just missed the mark

Following the events of “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice,” the new movie, “Justice League,” tells the story of a grief-stricken world coping with the death of Superman. Meanwhile,  Bruce Wayne hunts for heroes to form a team to stop the film’s antagonist, Steppenwolf, in his attempt to destroy Earth. I really wanted to love this film, which is directed by Zack Snyder with a screenplay by Joss Whedon and Chris Terrio. Like many others this summer after watching “Wonder Woman,” I felt inspired by the epic “badassery” that was Gal Gadot and Patty Jenkins. But after “Justice League,” I…

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Following the events of “Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice,” the new movie, “Justice League,” tells the story of a grief-stricken world coping with the death of Superman. Meanwhile,  Bruce Wayne hunts for heroes to form a team to stop the film’s antagonist, Steppenwolf, in his attempt to destroy Earth.

I really wanted to love this film, which is directed by Zack Snyder with a screenplay by Joss Whedon and Chris Terrio. Like many others this summer after watching “Wonder Woman,” I felt inspired by the epic “badassery” that was Gal Gadot and Patty Jenkins.

But after “Justice League,” I couldn’t help but be a little disappointed.

Here’s why:

Wonder Woman is noticeably more sexualized

I thought DC Films would be the forerunner of production companies that showcased strong women in a non-sexualizing way. I was misled.

There were many alterations made to the costuming of both Wonder Woman and the Amazonian warriors. Where in “Wonder Woman” the midriff of the female actresses were covered, in “Justice League” they doned cropped uniforms and the skirts were noticeably shorter.

There are many scenes where Gal Gadot is climbing alongside the other league members, or in the middle of a fight (as superheroes do), and her bottom is hanging out of the costume.

I support anyone’s choice in clothing and ownership of their sexuality ‒ but the over-sexualization of her character didn’t stop at her costume. Most camera tilts began at her ankle and moved up ending at her bottom.

There is also a scene where The Flash and Diana have a collision where he ends up on top of her chest and moves back, flustered.

It was a huge step back from the headshot angles of Wonder Woman and the refreshing way Steve Trevor looked Diana in her eyes and not at her chest.

Lack of genuine character writing

We are introduced to dynamic characters: Arthur Curry (Aquaman), Barry Allen (The Flash) and we meet Victor Stone (Cyborg). All three men have complex backgrounds and epic talents.

While individually each character was cool and collected, together I did not see a genuine connection as a team. The writers focused on the plotline, which lacked depth. The outcome of the movie is predictable and the characters are, too.

The movie ran for 121 minutes and could have easily included scenes that developed each character and the team.

Though it was not what I expected, the movie was not a complete bust. It’s a filler film, designed to set up “Legion of Doom” ‒ hold onto your hats, DC pulled a Marvel and there are teasers after the credits.

If you are a fan of the DC world, I wouldn’t rule out seeing the movie. Just be prepared to not be blown out of this world.