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What our country needs is a leader, not whatever Trump is

Between the hurricanes, the Las Vegas mass shooting and continued tension with North Korea, President Donald Trump has shown his true colors as a leader, and none of them are commendable.

It was an already known fact that Trump is a self-centered man who surrounds himself with ‘yes’ men as a means not to diminish his outrageous self-confidence and consistently remind him that he is doing a “good job.”

And if the ‘yes’ men he has acquired have failed to meet the standards of the job, he simply dismisses them and engages with another crop of people who will lie and tell him he is doing an excellent job as the leader of our country.

For one, Trump is doing a lackluster job when it comes to being president. For another, all he has done in his time as president is prove himself reactive, thoughtless and not at all productive.

Trump is statistically proven to be the least popular president in recent American history, with his presidential approval rating setting an all-time low of 34 percent – far lower than predecessor Barack Obama’s rating ever was.

However, even if you showed him the numbers, he might label them as “fake news,” tweet a rampage against his adversaries and move along to the next non-issue plaguing his reputation.

Trump embodies every single aspect of a bully mentality, and has done so since day one of his campaign. He is not above visibly favoring those who speak highly of him, just like he is not at all above publicly shaming anyone who dares to disagree with him.

When it came to NFL players choosing to kneel instead of stand during the National Anthem as a means to bring awareness to racial inequities occuring daily in society, Trump went on a days-long Twitter tirade that seems to continue by the day.

“The booing at the NFL football game last night, when the entire Dallas team dropped to its knees, was loudest I have ever heard. Great anger,” he tweeted on Sept. 26.

This is how Trump operates. He uses his Twitter account as a sounding board for all of his faithful supporters and it is through his tweets that he rallies all of the yes men he needs in order fulfill his ego.

Trump tweeted more on the day NFL players knelt for the National Anthem than he did on the day of the largest and deadliest mass-shooting in American history in Las Vegas on Sunday night, leaving more than 50 people dead and more than 500 people wounded.

And when he did tweet, it was lukewarm and generic.

We should not be part of a society that anxiously awaits for what terrible thing our president is going to say on a public forum. As a country, we deserve a leader who meets tragedy with calls to action and with an open mind for solutions from all, not just the people in his corner with only his best interests at heart.

But there was no call to action because Trump is not a man of action.

Even when Trump shows up, he does nothing to actively better the situation. He smiles and lends a hand for photo-ops, but does nothing to rectify situations or issues that are negatively affecting large parts of American society.

When visiting Puerto Rico on Tuesday, Trump continuously found ways to make the tragedy about his excellence as a leader and going so far as to compare the tragedy with Hurricane Katrina in terms of the death toll and half-joke about how relief efforts to re-establish Puerto Rico are negatively affecting the American budget.

That is not a leader. A leader is not someone who shows up for the photo-op and offers half-hearted apologies with no means to actually fix the situation for the people it is affecting.

A leader is someone like San Juan, Puerto Rico Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz, whose photo-op was captured while waist deep in hurricane-induced flooding, searching for survivors of Hurricane Maria.

A leader is not someone who uses tragedy as a means to parade around his lack of accomplishments and then wait for people to tell him how well they are doing.

Leaders take action. Leaders make things happen. Leaders listen to all sides as a means to find common ground and formulate a solution.

Instead, we have a leader who does not care about anything but his public persona and the people on his team that keep it intact.

America deserves a leader that will do more than offer meaningless words, belittle those who disagree with him or poke at the sleeping bear that is nuclear war.

It is discouraging to think of what a solution might be to our president’s antics, but without a real leader, our country is finding ways to step up and make differences in our own communities daily.

Though it seems impossible, do not give into the hopelessness that our country might feel like right now. Communities are making a difference. People are making a difference.

Don’t resort to the type of leadership that Trump is displaying and has displayed throughout the course of his presidency. We as a society are capable of and deserve so much better.

Between the hurricanes, the Las Vegas mass shooting and continued tension with North Korea, President Donald Trump has shown his true colors as a leader, and none of them are commendable.

It was an already known fact that Trump is a self-centered man who surrounds himself with ‘yes’ men as a means not to diminish his outrageous self-confidence and consistently remind him that he is doing a “good job.”

And if the ‘yes’ men he has acquired have failed to meet the standards of the job, he simply dismisses them and engages with another crop of people who will lie and tell him he is doing an excellent job as the leader of our country.

For one, Trump is doing a lackluster job when it comes to being president. For another, all he has done in his time as president is prove himself reactive, thoughtless and not at all productive.

Trump is statistically proven to be the least popular president in recent American history, with his presidential approval rating setting an all-time low of 34 percent – far lower than predecessor Barack Obama’s rating ever was.

However, even if you showed him the numbers, he might label them as “fake news,” tweet a rampage against his adversaries and move along to the next non-issue plaguing his reputation.

Trump embodies every single aspect of a bully mentality, and has done so since day one of his campaign. He is not above visibly favoring those who speak highly of him, just like he is not at all above publicly shaming anyone who dares to disagree with him.

When it came to NFL players choosing to kneel instead of stand during the National Anthem as a means to bring awareness to racial inequities occuring daily in society, Trump went on a days-long Twitter tirade that seems to continue by the day.

“The booing at the NFL football game last night, when the entire Dallas team dropped to its knees, was loudest I have ever heard. Great anger,” he tweeted on Sept. 26.

This is how Trump operates. He uses his Twitter account as a sounding board for all of his faithful supporters and it is through his tweets that he rallies all of the yes men he needs in order fulfill his ego.

Trump tweeted more on the day NFL players knelt for the National Anthem than he did on the day of the largest and deadliest mass-shooting in American history in Las Vegas on Sunday night, leaving more than 50 people dead and more than 500 people wounded.

And when he did tweet, it was lukewarm and generic.

We should not be part of a society that anxiously awaits for what terrible thing our president is going to say on a public forum. As a country, we deserve a leader who meets tragedy with calls to action and with an open mind for solutions from all, not just the people in his corner with only his best interests at heart.

But there was no call to action because Trump is not a man of action.

Even when Trump shows up, he does nothing to actively better the situation. He smiles and lends a hand for photo-ops, but does nothing to rectify situations or issues that are negatively affecting large parts of American society.

When visiting Puerto Rico on Tuesday, Trump continuously found ways to make the tragedy about his excellence as a leader and going so far as to compare the tragedy with Hurricane Katrina in terms of the death toll and half-joke about how relief efforts to re-establish Puerto Rico are negatively affecting the American budget.

That is not a leader. A leader is not someone who shows up for the photo-op and offers half-hearted apologies with no means to actually fix the situation for the people it is affecting.

A leader is someone like San Juan, Puerto Rico Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz, whose photo-op was captured while waist deep in hurricane-induced flooding, searching for survivors of Hurricane Maria.

A leader is not someone who uses tragedy as a means to parade around his lack of accomplishments and then wait for people to tell him how well they are doing.

Leaders take action. Leaders make things happen. Leaders listen to all sides as a means to find common ground and formulate a solution.

Instead, we have a leader who does not care about anything but his public persona and the people on his team that keep it intact.

America deserves a leader that will do more than offer meaningless words, belittle those who disagree with him or poke at the sleeping bear that is nuclear war.

It is discouraging to think of what a solution might be to our president’s antics, but without a real leader, our country is finding ways to step up and make differences in our own communities daily.

Though it seems impossible, do not give into the hopelessness that our country might feel like right now. Communities are making a difference. People are making a difference.

Don’t resort to the type of leadership that Trump is displaying and has displayed throughout the course of his presidency. We as a society are capable of and deserve so much better.