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Philosophical Hairpulling

Getting a Philosophy degree sounds impressive from an outsider’s perspective but that quickly changes as you undertake courses and begin to contemplate future employment.  

    Now I am fully aware that most who even consider philosophy are less inclined to be money-driven and are interested in scholarship.  

    I chose this route but on steroids, literally choosing the most circuitous route possible: art, philosophy and anthropology, all conjecture heavy disciplines with shaky long-term outlooks.  Unless I plan on remaining in academia in some fashion I have little faith that my current studies will lend themselves to help me stand out in a crowd upon hiring.  

    None of the skills I have acquired are tangible, the closest thing is my ability to think critically and to better form a question.  There has not been one day where I have left a lecture to what appeared to be a solution to a problem posed at the beginning of class.  Every single time without fail I leave with more questions than I started with.

    The mental gymnastics are tiresome and the very nature of philosophical studies helps to illuminate the greater awareness of these types of phenomenon. I am even under the current belief that most philosophical studies add to a nihilistic view of the world.  Essentially the erosion of morals and religious framework that gives meaning and a base from which to view the world.  

    Ideas dressed up in jargon that continually change and provide a “better” lense from which to approach the world is a thin veil that gets old quick.  Academic ethics is frustratingly unpractical and prefers to hideaway in its ivory tower of theory instead of application.

    Although it is not all bad as I have thoroughly enjoyed all of my professors and most of my peers but I have definitely grown weary of the process and will be glad when I graduate.

     I am also aware that this is a clear reflection of where I am currently and that perhaps I am asking the wrong things from philosophy.  It is quite possible that my expectations are skewed and when I look back upon this time I will be grateful and have a fuller, more comprehensive understanding of my experience.  I am beginning to believe that the struggle is paramount to growth and maybe, just maybe, this was the intended point all along.