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House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wisc., holds his weekly press conference on Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016 in Washington, D.C. According to sources, Ryan will not campaign with Donald Trump and told House GOP lawmakers to make their own decisions on whether to support the presidential nominee. (Bill Clark/Congressional Quarterly/Newscom/Zuma Press/TNS)

Republican Party maintains hold on House and Senate

The Republican Party held on to their party majority in the House of Representatives and the Senate on election night.

The GOP will continue their six-year streak under the direction of reelected House Speaker Paul Ryan.

“The fact that we [kept] this great majority in and of itself in a very, very difficult year is pretty darn good,” Ryan said.

Ryan was under fire the past month after announcing he does not support Donald Trump as the next president.

“He will spend his entire energy making sure that Hillary Clinton does not get a blank check with a Democrat-controlled Congress,” Ryan said.

After the announcement Ryan urged fellow lawmakers to follow their individual interests over the GOP as a whole.

“You all need to do what’s best for you and your district,” Ryan said.

The GOP also grabbed House seats from battleground states including Florida, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania, which were in the eyes of Democratic hopefuls.

Incumbent Carlos Curbelo kept Florida’s District 26 seat over Congressman Joe Garcia. Florida was also a key state in the presidential race having 29 electoral votes were clutched by Trump.

“I pledge to continue working to change the culture in Washington,” Curbelo said, “There is a lot of work to be done.”

In Oklahoma, Tom Cole won his eighth term as the state’s District 4 representative. He will be representing a state Trump won election night taking seven electoral votes.

“I’m very grateful, and I appreciate the support, particularly in an era where there’s a lot of distrust in government. I want to congratulate my opponents for running spirited and principled campaigns,” Cole said.

Cole among others is hopeful that the party majority in the House will lead to progressive legislation in the Republican movement.

“I always thought (Republicans) would maintain the majority in the House (of Representatives),” Cole said. “The real question is: Will we be the point of the spear moving legislation to a Republican president, or will we be a firewall preventing a Democrat president from going overboard like Barack Obama did in 2009-10?”

The House will now be in partnership with a Republican majority Senate in the lawmaking process after a night of victory for Congress.

It was announced Tuesday evening that all of Congress would now be under majority rule after the Republican Party took the Senate.

The GOP barely meets the minimum requirement for a Senate majority with getting exactly 51 seats.

Two Senate seats have grabbed by two past GOP presidential candidates Marco Rubio and John McCain.

Rubio won his second term as a US Senator for the state Florida. This state was also hard fight between both presidential nominees and stayed at a close tie until Trump claimed the victory.

“America’s going to be OK. We will turn this country around,” Rubio said, “As we return to work in Washington, D.C., can set a better example of how political discourse can exist in this country.”

Across the state in Arizona former 2008 Republican presidential nominee John McCain won his sixth term as Senator. McCain said this was one of his toughest races yet claiming a 52.5 percent vote over Democratic revival Ann Kirkpatrick with 42.1 percent.

“I’ve never been more honored by anything than the privilege of representing you in the United States Senate,” said McCain, “I’ve never taken it for granted, and I never will. I’m as grateful to you tonight as I was when you first elected me.”

America will begin the new presidential term with a great number of Republican incumbents coming together in Congress with hopes of future legislative movements.